EU Bookmark and Share  
New anti-terrorism powers passed by European Parliament
17.2.17
Follow us: | | Tweet


The European Parliament voted on Thursday 15 February to approve the controversial new Directive on combating terrorism, as well as amendments to the Schengen Borders Code that will mean all EU citizens now have to be checked against the Schengen Information System, Interpol's Lost and Stolen Travel Documents database, and "other relevant databases" whenever they enter or exit the Schengen area.

European Parliament press releases

Preventing terrorism: clampdown on foreign fighters and lone wolves (pdf):

"To counter the growing threats from “foreign fighters” travelling to conflict zones for terrorist purposes and “lone wolves” planning solo attacks, new EU-wide rules were approved by Parliament on Thursday.

The new directive on combatting terrorism will update the current EU “framework” rules on terrorist offences and widen their scope to include emerging threats."

Stopping foreign fighters at EU external borders (pdf):

"All EU citizens and third country nationals entering or leaving the EU will be systematically checked against databases, e.g. of lost and stolen documents, under a regulation voted on Thursday. The new rules were agreed by Parliament’s negotiators and the Council of Ministers on 5 December 2016. "

Critique

Recklessly unclear Terrorism Directive creates significant risks for citizens’ security (EDRi, link):

"On 16 February 2017, the European Parliament voted in favour of the EU Directive on combating terrorism. Weak, unclear, ambiguous wording in the Directive presents dangers for the rule of law, the right to privacy and freedom of opinion and expression of people in the European Union.

'Adopting a Directive that is unclear and wide open to abuse is little short of reckless. The Directive brings few obvious gains for security, but its ambiguity creates major risks for democratic freedoms,' said Maryant Fernández Pérez, Senior Policy Advisor at European Digital Rights (EDRi).

'We will now have to wait over four years for the European Commission to assess whether the Directive and its implementation by Member States violate our fundamental rights and freedoms. This is unacceptable,' she added."

Background information and documentation

Directive on combating terrorism (Statewatch European Monitoring and Documentation Centre)

Support our work by making a one-off or regular donation to help us continue to monitor the state and civil liberties in Europe.
Search our database for more articles and information or subscribe to our mailing list for regular updates from Statewatch News Online.

We welcome contributions to News Online and comments on this website. E-mail us, call +44 (0) 207 697 4266, or send post to Statewatch, 356 Holloway Road, London N7 6PA

Home | News Online | Journal | Observatories | Analyses | Database | SEMDOC | About Statewatch

© Statewatch ISSN 1756-851X. Personal usage as private individuals/"fair dealing" is allowed. We also welcome links to material on our site. Usage by those working for organisations is allowed only if the organisation holds an appropriate licence from the relevant reprographic rights organisation (eg: Copyright Licensing Agency in the UK) with such usage being subject to the terms and conditions of that licence and to local copyright law.