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Statewatch Analyses: Biometric identity cards; Undercover policing; Criminalisation of solidarity; EU migration policies in Morocco; from GAMM to "Partnership Frameworks"
5.11.18
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Over the last fortnight Statewatch has published five new analyses looking at a series of crucial issues in the EU and beyond: proposals for biometric identity cards across the EU; European networks for coordinating undercover policing; decriminalising solidarity movements through the regularisation of migrants; the effects of EU migration policies on the ground in Morocco; and migration: from the "carrot and stick" to the "stick" in Africa.

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- Fingerprints in identity cards: who will oppose an unjustified and unnecessary proposal?

The Council and the Parliament are both currently discussing their negotiating positions on the proposal for new EU rules on national identity cards and residence documents issued to EU citizens and their family members when they reside in another Member State. Unless amendments proposed by left, liberal and green MEPs are taken into account, the Parliament will follow the Council and Commission in approving the mandatory fingerprinting of hundreds of millions of EU citizens.

- Undercover policing: the "alphabet soup" of cross-border networks, groups and projects

The Undercover Policing Inquiry that has been in place in the UK since 2015 will never uncover the full truth about the police infiltration of social and political organisations whilst it has no remit to examine the activities of British officers outside England and Wales. This briefing outlines the transnational police groups, networks and organisations that are known to exist for the purpose of coordinating undercover police operations across state borders, primarily in Europe.

- Decriminalising solidarity by promoting the regularisation of migrants

Translation of a speech given by Fulvio Vassallo Paleologo (Osservatorio Solidarieta Carta di Milano) at the session "Decriminalizing Solidarity: an ever more topical challenge", Sabir Festival, Palermo, 13 October 2018.

- Morocco: Wherever EU immigration policy rears its ugly head, violence and abuses follow

In the summer of 2018, after concerted efforts since 2014 by the EU and its Member States to block off the eastern (Turkey to Greece) and central (Tunisia and Libya to Italy) routes across the Mediterranean used by migrants and refugees to reach Europe, there was an increase in crossings using the western route (Morocco, and sometimes Algeria, to Spain). This was accompanied by an increase in deaths at sea and, in Morocco, extensive police operations to remove black African migrants from the north of the country, based on racial profiling and flagrant breaches of human rights.

- Migration policy: From the "carrot and stick" to the "stick", from GAMM (the Global Approach to Migration and Mobility) to "Partnership Frameworks" in Africa

The EU has finally lost patience with a decade-long approach based on dialogue with countries in Africa calling for the return and readmission of refugees. Under plans adopted by the European Commission on 7 June 2106 the EU is explicitly seeking to exploit Member States’ historical neo-colonial links to try to contain the movement of migrants and refugees.

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